[Follow-up question] Difference in "leanness" between "tarball-install" and "xbps-install base-system"?


#1

Dear friends

https://wiki.voidlinux.eu/Installation_via_chroot says: “… you should now have an extremely minimal and lightweight install of Void Linux”.

I’d like to do a most minimal install and wonder if a “tarball install” will be more minimal than an install by xbps-install base-system, as described in https://wiki.voidlinux.eu/Installation_on_UEFI,_via_chroot.

Does anybody know, or could you tell me where I can look up and compare the packages involved in these two installation methods?

Many thanks and best regards!


#2

It should be exactly the same, the tarballs are just base-system, the difference in using tarballs versus xbps-install is that xbps-install will always be up to date.


#3

The rootfs tarball is the base-system meta-package, if not slightly outdated. From a dependencies perspective, you’re effectively looking at the same thing.

The base meta-package includes various packages you may or may not need (f2fs-tools, dhcpcd, wifi-firmware, void-artwork, etc). This can be easily avoided by xbps-install(ing) only the ones you require.

Both deployment methods (rootfs and xbps-install base-system) will install the dependencies that are declared in the depends variable of the template.


#4

For a absolut minimal installation you should just install the required packages using xbps-install in a chroot environment or to a mounted partition. But you should know which packages you need.


#5

Dear friends

Many thanks to all of you for your helpful answers! Now I know what to do :grinning:

Best regards, and have a nice evening!


#6

Dear friends

Sorry to come up with a follow-up question. But perhaps someone can help?

I have tried to install the individual packages listed in the template (all of them, except for some filesystem and WiFi utilities I don’t need). Unfortunately, the /etc/shadow and /etc/shadow- files were not created, even after reinstalling shadow. The issue occurs in both x_86-64-glibc and x86_64-musl.

I assume these files should be created by the system and not by the user. What can I do to get them?

Many thanks and best regards


#7

You probably used XBPS_TARGET_ARCH which does not run hooks, XBPS_ARCH can be used if the host architecture can run hooks for the target architecture.
You can also use xbps-reconfigure -f pkgname inside your chroot, xbps-query -l indicates which packages are not configured by prefixing it with uu, see the xbps-query(1).